SEM: S. Davies, « Atlantic Encounters, Renaissance Maps », 16 déc., 17h30

La prochaine séance du Paris Early Modern Seminar: Séminaire interuniversitaire sur la première modernité britannique (1500-1700) aura lieu le 16 décembre 2016, de 17 h 30 à 19 h 30 dans la salle de formation de la Bibliothèque interuniversitaire de la Sorbonne (Entrée 17 rue de la Sorbonne, 75005 Paris). Elle sera parrainée par IMAGER (EA 3958) Université Paris-Est-Créteil-Val-de-Marne.

Nous y entendrons une intervention de Surekha Davies (Western Connecticut State University), intitulée: “Atlantic Encounters, Renaissance Maps and the Invention of the Human” (discutante: Charlotte Coffin).

Pour des raisons de sécurité, l’inscription est obligatoire au moins 48 h avant le séminaire, par simple envoi d’un mail à l’adresse pems2016@yahoo.com, sauf pour les personnes déjà titulaires d’une carte de la bibliothèque de la Sorbonne.

English version:

The next meeting of the  Paris Early Modern Seminar: Séminaire interuniversitaire sur la première modernité britannique (1500-1700) will be held on 16 December 2016, 17.30-19.30 pm in the Salle de formation at the Bibliothèque interuniversitaire de la Sorbonne (Entrée 17 rue de la Sorbonne, 75005 Paris). This session is sponsored by IMAGER (EA 3958) Université Paris-Est-Créteil-Val-de-Marne.

Dr.  Surekha Davies (Western Connecticut State University) will be giving a talk on “Atlantic Encounters, Renaissance Maps and the Invention of the Human” (respondent: Charlotte Coffin).

For security reasons it is necessary to register at least two days before the event, simply by sending a message to pems2016@yahoo.com.

Avec mes sentiments cordiaux,

Louise Fang
Secrétaire de PEMS
https://pems.hypotheses.org

Abstract:

Writings from classical antiquity and biblical scripture informed European expectations about distant parts of the world. Among these expectations was the idea that human bodies, behaviors and temperaments were shaped by the local climate and environment. During the long sixteenth century, scholars, geographers and mapmakers investigated the relationship between information garnered from westward voyages across the Atlantic and pre-existing ideas about the inhabitants of the distant east and south. This talk reveals how Renaissance maps functioned as visualization tools that shaped European perceptions of the peoples of the Americas. By making the connections between geography, climate and human variety explicit and visual, maps made the classical concept of ‘monstrous peoples’ deformed by nature central to the fluid category of ‘human’. Ethnographic imagery on maps illuminates an important way in which Atlantic science was a visual pursuit. It also shows that there was an intellectual incentive to invent race long before there was a commercial one.

About the speaker:

Dr Surekha Davies is the author of Renaissance Ethnography and the Invention of the Human: New Worlds, Maps and Monsters(Cambridge University Press, 2016). Her research interests include cultural encounters (particularly between Europe and the Americas), travel writing, geographical exploration, cartography, monster theory, collecting and museums, and the history of mentalities from the late Middle Ages tothe nineteenth century. She is Assistant Professor of History at Western Connecticut State University.
Dr Davies is a founding editor of a new book series, Maps, Spaces, Cultures (Brill). Her articles have appeared in journals including The Historical Journal, the Journal of Early Modern History, Renaissance Studies and History and Anthropology. Her research has been supported by fellowships and grants from the American Philosophical Society, the John Carter Brown Library, the American Historical Association, the Library of Congress, the Folger Library, the Newberry Library, the Leverhulme Trust and, most recently, the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, at which she will be spending the summer of 2017. She is now working on a new monograph on European encounters with indigenous artefacts from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries, called Collecting Artifacts in the Age of Empire.


Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.