Archives de catégorie : seminar

JE PEMS/ LRS “London Locations”, 14 juin 2024, Birkbeck: programme

LONDON LOCATIONS:

URBAN GEOGRAPHY, CREATIVE OPPORTUNITIES AND LITERARY REPRESENTATIONS

Paris Early Modern Seminar and London Renaissance Seminar Joint Conference

Organised by Sue Wiseman, Aurélie Griffin and Eva Lauenstein

June 14, 2024

9.00am-6.00pm

 

Keynes Library, also known as Room 114

Birkbeck

43 Gordon Square,

London WC1

Hand-coloured map of London cut from 1635 edition of Georg Braun and Franz Hogenberg, Civitatis Orbis Terrarum.  MAP L85c no.27 (Digital Image File 3371). Used by permission of the Folger Shakespeare Library under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license. For better image resolution, view the image in LUNA.

Source: Civitates orbis terrarum. Public Domain Mark 1.0 https://www.bl.uk/collection-items/view-of-london-in-civitates-orbis-terrarum

What happened where in seventeenth century London – and why is that important? Panellists explore the many dimensions of place, space and person and analyse many kinds of texts from plays and letters to songs and parish records. These raise issues about the relationships between art and commerce, crime and justice, memory and reputation. Please do join us and share your thoughts.

9.00 Coffee

9.30-10.10 At a distance: London from Abroad

‘Home away from home: Memories of London locations in some early modern English accounts of distant travels’

Ladan Niayesh

10.10-10.55 Zooming in: Mapping people and place

Strange Inventions, Strange Changes and a Strange Order: Donald Lupton’s Subtly Subversive Gazeteer of Early Modern London
Claire Labarbe

‘Park Life: Hyde Park (1637); St. James Park (1671)’
Mark Houlahan


10.55-11.30 Coffee

11.30-12.10 Excavating: times and memories
‘Contact zones: Clerkenwell and the 1594/5 Gray’s Inn Revels’
Michelle O’Callaghan

12.10-1.30pm lunch

1.30-pm-2.30pm Living: the City
John Heminges (1566 – 1630): editor of the First Folio, ‘Citizen and Grocer’, and parish constable.
Meryl Faiers

‘ “A Mint in the Temple”: Coining in seventeenth century London’
 Judith Hudson 

2.30-3.00 Break


3pm-3.55 Commerce / theatre

‘ “Playing the Whore”: Early Modern Bawdy Houses as Theatrical Spaces’
Kameron R.L. Johnson


‘The Golden Pen: Peter Bales and the Blackfriars Writing Challenge of 1595’
Grace Murray

4.00-4.55 Beyond the Borders: East, South, West
‘Experiencing the Everyday in the East India Company’s Yard at Blackwall’

Michael Powell-Davis

‘Plague, Sewers, and Sunday Drinking: Locating the Globe Stairs and the Globe Tavern’
Héloïse M. Sénéchal

‘Consumption, Purging and Beyond the Borders’

Amelia Ormondroyd-Williams

4.55-5.15 break

5.15-6.00  Heterotopia? Mixing it
‘Where Actors and Musicians Meet: Creative Communities at the Early Modern Inns of Court’
Simon Smith


6.00 Drinks

ICCEMS/PEMS Seminar, 16/05/24, Ladan Niayesh (Paris-Cité), Laetitia Sansonetti (Paris-Nanterre) & guest editors, “Introducing the Polyglot Encounters in Early Modern Britain Series”

 

The Paris Early Modern Seminar is delighted to host the first online seminar of the International Consortium for Early Modern Studies.

The event will be held over Zoom. The link will be shared with PEMS members the week before.

More information about the Polyglot Encounters Brepols series: https://www.brepols.net/series/PEEMB

Abstract

In this presentation, we would like to introduce the series we co-edit with Brepols publishers, “Polyglot Encounters in Early Modern Britain” (https://www.brepols.net/series/PEEMB). The aim of this series is to investigate polyglot practices in early modern English literary texts by crossing perspectives in a transdisciplinary approach. Volumes in the series analyse how an English linguistic, but also social and political, and more generally cultural, identity is built by means of contact and interaction with other languages, through borrowings and translations.

We will present briefly volume 1, which was published in 2022, volume 2, which will come out later this year, and volume 3, in preparation. We will then open a discussion with the group about what polyglossia means for us who work in early modern studies, how it can help us think the triangulation between languages, lands and nations in an era of commerce, colonisation and conflict, and in particular the place of English and England within the British Isles and beyond, put in geographical and linguistic perspective with other languages and nations, near and far.

About the Speakers

Laetitia Sansonetti is Senior Lecturer in English (Translation Studies) at Université Paris Nanterre and a junior fellow of Institut Universitaire de France. Her research bears on the reception of classical and continental texts in early modern England, language learning, poetry and rhetoric and questions of authorship and authority. Her current research project on translation and polyglossia in early modern England (https://tape1617.hypotheses.org/) is funded by a five-year grant from Institut Universitaire de France.

Ladan Niayesh is Professor of Early Modern Studies at the University of Paris (ex-Paris Diderot) and a member of the LARCA research centre of the CNRS (UMR 8225). Her research focuses on Early Modern travel writing and travel drama, more specifically in connection to Muscovy and Persia. Her latest publications include Three Romances of Eastern Conquest (Manchester University Press, 2018) and Eastern Resonances (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019), coedited with Claire Gallien. She currently coedits the Persian travels of the Sherley brothers with Kurosh Meshkat and Alasdair MacDonald for the Hakluyt Society.

Other speakers will include: 

Charlotte Coffin is Senior Lecturer in early modern English literature and culture at Université Paris-Est Créteil and a member of Institut des Mondes Anglophone, Germanique et Roman (IMAGER). Her research focuses on the reception of classical texts in early modern England and the uses of classical mythology in drama by Shakespeare, Heywood and their contemporaries. She is interested in matters of circulation, intertextuality, book history and theatre history. Recent publications include five entries for the Arden dictionary of Shakespeare’s classical mythology (forthcoming in 2024), a chapter in Thomas Heywood and the Classical Tradition (Manchester University Press, 2021) and a special issue of Études Épistémè on The Politics of Form in Early Modern Europe (2021), coedited with Paloma Bravo and Séverine Delahaye-Grélois. She also coedited Interweaving Myths in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries (Manchester University Press, 2017) with Janice Valls-Russell and Agnès Lafont. 
 
Chloë Houston is Associate Professor of Early Modern Drama in the Department of English Literature at the University of Reading. Her research focuses on the portrayal of cultural and religious difference in early modern literature and performance, and she has published a number of articles on the representation of Persia in English plays and travel writings in the early modern period. Her latest monograph, Persia in Early Modern English Drama, 1530-1699: The Imagined Empire, was published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2023.
 
Agnès Lafont is Senior Lecturer in Early Modern Studies at Université Paul Valéry-Montpellier  3 and a member of the Institut de Recherche sur la Renaissance, l’âge Classique et les Lumières (UMR 5186 CNRS). She works on the reception of classical myths in Renaissance poetry, drama (in the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries John Lyly, George Peele and Christopher Marlowe), and mythography. She studies the ways in which direct and indirect circulations of classical models (mostly Ovidian) shape English reception from the 1550s to the 1620s. She wrote her unpublished PhD on the myth of Diana in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama (‘Visages de Diane dans le théâtre élisabéthain et jacobéen (1560-1616)’) and has published several articles on mythology. She edited Shakespeare’s Erotic Mythology and Ovidian Renaissance Culture (Routledge, 2013), co-edited (with J. Valls-Russell and Ch. Coffin), Interweaving Myths in Shakespeare and his contemporaries (Manchester University Press, 2017), and co-edited (with M.-P. Noël and P. Pontier), ‘Autour des mythes de Thésée et de Perséphone. Tradition, Transferts, Transmissions (Antiquité-XVIIe siècle)’ (Les Cahiers du Théâtre Antique 22, 4, 2021). She is currently preparing the edition of The Maid’s Metamorphosis (Anonymous, 1600) for Manchester University Press. She is assistant editor for Cahiers Elisabéthains.
 

Sophie Lemercier-Goddard is Associate Professor of English at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon. Her research focuses on issues of space, identity, translation in early modern drama but also on voyages of exploration in the period. She has published several articles on Shakespeare and has written on English travel writing, especially on the search for the Northwest passage. She has co-edited with S. Chiari John Webster’s ‘Dismal Tragedy’: The Duchess of Malfi Reconsidered (2019) and “Work, work your thoughts”: Henry V revisited (2021).

 
Rémi Vuillemin is Senior Lecturer in early modern English literature at Université de Strasbourg. The author of a monograph on Michael Drayton’s sonnet sequences, Le Recueil pétrarquiste à l’ère du maniérisme: poétique des sonnets de Michael Drayton, 1594–1619 (2014), his work bears on the early modern English sonnet, its reception past and present, and early modern poetic theory. Recently, he has co-edited two collective volumes, The Early Modern English Sonnet (Manchester University Press, 2020), and Language Commonality and Literary Communities in Early Modern England (Brepols, 2022). He has just finished writing a monograph on the framing of lyric collections.

This online seminar will take place on 16 May, 10am-11.30pm CEST (UTC +2).

SEM 28/03/2024, 17h30: Julie Vanparys-Rotondi (UCA), “Katherine Parr et son entourage féminin face aux tensions confessionnelles dans l’Angleterre du XVIème siècle”

La Réforme anglaise au féminin, Katherine Parr, Elizabeth Tyrwhit et Anne Askew

Le Paris Early Modern Seminar aura le plaisir de recevoir Julie Vanparys-Rotondi (Université Clermont-Auvergne) pour la présentation de son ouvrage La réforme anglaise au féminin – Katherine Parr, Elizabeth Tyrwhit et Anne Askew, publié aux Presses universitaires de Strasbourg en 2023.

La rencontre aura lieu de 17h30 à 19h en Salle du Conseil (Maison de Recherche de la Sorbonne Nouvelle, 4 rue des Irlandais 75005).

Les discutant.e.s seront Aurélie Griffin (USN) et Guillaume Coatalen (CYU).

 
Présentation de l’ouvrage  La réforme anglaise au féminin – Katherine Parr, Elizabeth Tyrwhit et Anne Askew (Presses universitaires de Strasbourg, 2023)
 
Cet ouvrage étudie la figure et l’engagement de trois femmes dont le rôle fut notable, sous diverses formes, dans le mouvement de la Réforme protestante en Angleterre. Pour la première fois, sont mises en parallèle les démarches de la reine Katherine Parr (c. 1512-1548), d’Anne Askew (1521-1546) et d’Elizabeth Tyrwhit (c. 1519-1578), actrice peu connue de la Réforme anglaise et proche du mouvement puritain, que cette étude croisée permet de faire découvrir au public francophone. En effet, l’auteure entrelace les destins de ces trois femmes dans le contexte confessionnel délétère du XVIe siècle anglais, leurs témoignages de foi et leur influence auprès de leurs contemporains et au-delà.
 
Julie Vanparys-Rotondi est maîtresse de conférences au département d’études anglophones de l’université Clermont Auvergne. Elle est membre du centre de recherche de l’Institut d’histoire des représentations et des idées dans les modernités (IHRIM-UMR 5317 du CNRS). Ses travaux portent sur les questions religieuses en Angleterre au début de la période moderne. Parallèlement, elle s’intéresse à l’histoire des sciences et des pratiques agricoles dans les manuels d’agronomie anglais de la première modernité et à leurs liens avec la Réforme.

SEM: 15/02/2024, 17 h 30: “Présentation de l’édition numérique du MS 787 de Douai (Sorbonne Université, University of Victoria)”, L. Cottegnies, avec L. Fang, B. Rouchon, C. Saignol et N. Thibault (Maison recherche Sorbonne nouvelle)

La prochaine séance du Paris Early Modern Seminar aura lieu le jeudi 15 février à la Maison de la Recherche de La Sorbonne Nouvelle. Nous aurons le plaisir de recevoir l’équipe du projet d’édition numérique du manuscrit 787 de Douai (Bibliothèque Marceline Desbordes-Valmore) piloté par Mme la Professeure Line Cottegnies (Sorbonne Université) avec la collaboration de Côme Saignol (développeur), Béatrice Rouchon (Doctorante, SU), Ada Souchu (Masterante, SU), Nicolas Thibault (doctorant, SU), Emma Bartel (docteure, SU), John Delsinne (Doctorant, SU) et Louise Fang (MCF Sorbonne Paris Nord).

Vous trouverez le descriptif ci-dessous.

La discutante sera Charlotte Coffin (UPEC).

La rencontre aura lieu de 17h30 à 19h, le jeudi 15 février, en salle
Claude Simon (Maison de Recherche de la Sorbonne Nouvelle, 4 rue des Irlandais 75005).

Présentation de l’édition numérique du MS 787 de la Bibliothèque Marceline Desbordes-Valmore, Douai (Sorbonne Université, University of Victoria)
Line Cottegnies, en collaboration avec Côme Saignol, Béatrice Rouchon, Ada Souchu, Nicolas Thibault, Emma Bartel, John Delsinne et Louise Fang
La Bibliothèque Marceline Desbordes-Valmore conserve depuis la fondation de la Bibliothèque de Douai un recueil manuscrit (sous la cote MS 787) de neuf pièces de théâtre anglaises transcrites par un scribe anonyme en 1694 et 1695, et qui provient très probablement d’une des nombreuses institutions anglaises, collèges ou monastères, qui existaient alors à Douai. Six de ces pièces sont de Shakespeare : trois comédies, Twelfth Night, As You Like It et The Comedy of Errors, suivies de trois tragédies, Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar et Macbeth. Ce manuscrit présente un très grand intérêt pour les spécialistes de Shakespeare et pour les historiens étudiant la vie des catholiques anglais, les collèges de la période de la première modernité ou l’histoire du théâtre. Notre projet, commencé pendant la crise sanitaire, arrive au terme de sa première phase, la première partie des pièces étant mises à la disposition du public. Il vise à offrir une édition numérique semi-diplomatique du texte, avec un appareil critique, des six pièces de Shakespeare dans un premier temps (seconde livraison des trois pièces restantes, printemps 2024). L’équipe du projet, fruit d’une collaboration entre Sorbonne Université, l’Université de Victoria (Canada) et la Bibliothèque Marceline Desbordes-Valmore, est dirigée par Line Cottegnies, et composée au 1er janvier 2023 de: Emma Bartel (Docteure, SU), John Delsinne (Doctorant, SU), Louise Fang (MCF Sorbonne Paris Nord), Béatrice Rouchon (Doctorante, SU), Côme Saignol (développeur), Ada Souchu (Masterante, SU), Nicolas Thibault (Doctorant, SU).
En vous souhaitant une excellente semaine,

Séance PEMS du 15/02/24, 17h30-19h: Line Cottegnies et al., Présentation de l’édition numérique du MS 787 de la Bibliothèque Marceline Desbordes-Valmore, Douai (Sorbonne Université, University of Victoria)

 

Par Line Cottegnies, en collaboration avec Côme Saignol, Béatrice Rouchon, Ada Souchu, Nicolas Thibault,  Emma Bartel, John Delsinne et Louise Fang
 
Modératrice: Charlotte Coffin
 
Lieu: salle Claude Simon (Maison de la Recherche de La Sorbonne Nouvelle, 4 rue des Irlandais, 75005) de 17h30 à 19h
 

La Bibliothèque Marceline Desbordes-Valmore conserve depuis la fondation de la Bibliothèque de Douai un recueil manuscrit (sous la cote MS 787) de neuf pièces de théâtre anglaises transcrites par un scribe anonyme en 1694 et 1695, et qui provient très probablement d’une des nombreuses institutions anglaises, collèges ou monastères, qui existaient alors à Douai. Six de ces pièces sont de Shakespeare : trois comédies, Twelfth Night, As You Like It et The Comedy of Errors, suivies de trois tragédies, Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar et Macbeth. Ce manuscrit présente un très grand intérêt pour les spécialistes de Shakespeare et pour les historiens étudiant la vie des catholiques anglais, les collèges de la période de la première modernité ou l’histoire du théâtre. Notre projet, commencé pendant la crise sanitaire, arrive au terme de sa première phase, la première partie des pièces étant mises à la disposition du public. Il vise à offrir une édition numérique semi-diplomatique du texte, avec un appareil critique, des six pièces de Shakespeare dans un premier temps (seconde livraison des trois pièces restantes, printemps 2024). L’équipe du projet, fruit d’une collaboration entre Sorbonne Université, l’Université de Victoria (Canada) et la Bibliothèque Marceline Desbordes-Valmore, est dirigée par Line Cottegnies, et composée au 1er janvier 2024 de: Emma Bartel (jeune docteure, SU), John Dessine (Doctorant, SU), Louise Fang (MCF Paris-Nord), Béatrice Rouchon (Doctorante, SU) Côme Saignol (développeur), Ada Souci (Masterante, SU), Nicolas Thibault (Doctorant, SU). 

CFP: LRS/ PEMS One-day Conference, “London Locations”, 14 June 2024, Birkbeck

London Locations: Urban Geography, Creative Opportunities and Literary Representations

London Renaissance Seminar / Paris Early Modern Seminar One-day Conference

14 June 2024

Room 106

43 Gordon Square, WC1H 0PD

Birkbeck, University of London

Hand-coloured map of London cut from 1635 edition of Georg Braun and Franz Hogenberg, Civitatis Orbis Terrarum.  MAP L85c no.27 (Digital Image File 3371). Used by permission of the Folger Shakespeare Library under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license. For better image resolution, view the image in LUNA.

Source: Civitates orbis terrarum. Public Domain Mark 1.0 https://www.bl.uk/collection-items/view-of-london-in-civitates-orbis-terrarum

 

What did London locations mean to sixteenth- and seventeenth-century people, and what do they mean to contemporary scholars?

Exploring both aspects of London’s places, this one-day conference considers the many meanings of London’s places for literary and cultural research. As a hugely expanding metropolis and the centre of printing, law, playing and the court as well as offering key opportunities to clerics and religious dissidents, London locations can be significant in many ways. Please tell us about well-known and notorious places – St Paul’s, the playhouses, the court – or about corners and streets we have forgotten, misunderstood and overlooked. You might want to find out more about where your author landed, how she lived in Cheapside, Stepney or Edmonton; how a printer worked; where ballads were sold, how a comedy uses London’s streets. You might want to tell us about the City of London or its suburbs and close villages, and speak about London’s evolving geography and architecture before and after the Great Fire. How did artists and writers inhabit its streets and how was their work inspired by it? Which London Locations facilitated the creation of networks for artists? We are keen to hear about primary material and located research as we think about whether London is a cosmopolis, global centre, birthplace of empire.

At the same time, we want to know how we should approach these London locations and we welcome papers considering how we should theorise London’s places and what London’s locations suggest about its place in the world.

Papers will be between 15 and 20 minutes (length tbc) and we welcome proposals from scholars at all career stages. We are keen to have abstracts from historians, art historians and literary scholars. Please send an abstract of 150-200 words stating the location or locations you explore, the main terrain of your argument and what you want to discuss and a short biographical note, to s.wiseman@bbk.ac.uk, e.lauenstein@bbk.ac.uk and aurelie.griffin@sorbonne-nouvelle.fr by Friday 5 April 2024.

 

Jeudi 23 Novembre 2023, 17h30-19h, Nandini Das: “Courting India: England, Mughal India and the Origins of Empire”

Séance organisée par : Université Paris-Cité

NB: la séance aura lieu de 17h30 à 19h à l’Université Paris-Cité, bâtiment Olympe de gouges (place Paul Ricoeur, 75013 Paris), salle 830.

When Thomas Roe arrived in India in 1616 as James I’s first ambassador
to the Mughal Empire, the English barely had a toehold in the
subcontinent. Their understanding of South Asian trade and India was
sketchy at best, and, to the Mughals, they were minor players on a
very large stage. Roe was representing a kingdom that was beset by
financial woes and deeply conflicted about its identity as a unified
‘Great Britain’ under the Stuart monarchy. Meanwhile, the court he
entered in India was wealthy and cultured, its dominion widely
considered to be one of the greatest and richest empires of the world.
This book offers a fascinating history of Roe’s four years in India,
an insider’s view of a Britain in the making, a country whose imperial
seeds were just being sown. It is a story of palace intrigue and
scandal, lotteries and wagers that unfolds as global trade begins to
stretch from Russia to Virginia, from West Africa to the Spice Islands
of Indonesia. The book explores the art, literature, sights and sounds of Jacobean London and Imperial India. It reveals Thomas Roe’s time in the Mughal Empire to be a turning point in history, and offers a rich and radical challenge to our understanding of Britain and its early empire.

Discutante: Ladan Niayesh

 

jeudi 11 mai 2023, 17h30-19h, Victoria Moul (UCL), Protestant poetics, c. 1550-1650: the sixteenth-century transformation of Latin verse and its impact on English poetry

Séance organisée par : Université Sorbonne Nouvelle Paris 3

Lieu: Maison de la recherche Sorbonne nouvelle, 4 rue des Irlandais (75005), salle du conseil + Zoom (ask our secretary, Mathilde Alazraki, for the link: mathilde.alazraki@hotmail.fr) 

Protestant poetics, c. 1550-1650: the sixteenth-century transformation of Latin verse and its impact on English poetry
 
The lively debate about English prosody, focused in particular upon the decorum of rhyme and the role of quantitative metrics, is a well-known feature of late Elizabethan literary criticism. But the intense interest in form and metre at this period, which culminates in the metrical variety and pronounced innovation of the Sidney Psalter and, ultimately, in the achievement of Herbert’s Temple, sits within, and emerges from, a geographically wider and chronologically precedent Latin phenomenon. Although it has gone unremarked in modern scholarship, the range of available forms and metres for Latin verse underwent very rapid change in the second half of the sixteenth century, leading to an explosion in the possibilities especially for Latin lyric. This paper, drawing extensively upon both printed and manuscript sources, will offer an overview of this revolution in Latin poetics, while also suggesting some of the most important points of contact between formal developments in English and in Latin verse. Works mentioned or discussed are likely to include those of Walter Haddon, Abraham Fraunce, Philip and Mary Sidney, George Herbert, Richard Crashaw and Abraham Cowley.
 
Victoria Moul is Reader in Early Modern Latin and English at University College London. She has published widely on classical, early modern and modern poetry in English and Latin, with particular expertise in the bilingual literary culture of early modernity. Her most recent book in this field is A Literary History of Latin and English Poetry: Bilingual Literary Culture in Early Modern England, published last year by Cambridge University Press.

Vendredi 14 avril 2023, 16h30-18h: Janelle Jenstad (University of Victoria, Canada), Early Modern Stage Directions and the Encoded Playbook: Text or Markup?

Séance conjointe PEMS / ShakeS (Shakespeare en Sorbonne), organisée par : Sorbonne Université

Lieu: Maison de la recherche de Sorbonne, rue Serpente (75006), salle D 323. Also on Zoom – please write to our secretary for the link: mathilde.alazraki@hotmail.fr )

“Early Modern Stage Directions and the Encoded Playbook: Text or Markup?”

How we encode, render, and count stage directions in a digital edition depends on the relationship between stage directions and the rest of the text. Are stage directions paratexts or are they part of the text of the playbook? What information do we need to capture when we encode stage directions? Where and how should we display them in our digital interface? And how should we number them in order to make them linkable and citable? This paper begins by showing the shifting placement of stage directions relative to the text block in the period 1500 to 1700 and briefly summarizing the recent burst of scholarship on stage directions, their purpose, authorship, and intended user. Then the paper turns to the challenge of encoding stage directions in the XML markup language of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) and reflects on the applicability of the <stage> element specification to early modern drama. Finally, the paper turns to how the Linked Early Modern Drama Online (LEMDO) project proposes to handle the rendering and numbering of stage directions both in our digital editions and in the LEMDO Hornbooks print-on-demand series. (This paper draws on research jointly conducted with Jamie Cassels Undergraduate Research Award student Mahayla Galliford.)

Janelle Jenstad is Professor of English at University of Victoria. She directs The Map of Early Modern London (MoEML) and Linked Early Modern Drama Online (LEMDO), and co-coordinates The New Internet Shakespeare Editions (NISE) and Digital Renaissance Editions (DRE). With Jennifer Roberts-Smith and Mark Kaethler, she co-edited Shakespeare’s Language in Digital Media (Routledge). With Kaethler, she is co-general editing the MoEML Mayoral Shows Anthology (MoMS). She is editing in particular John Stow’s A Survey of London (1598 and 1633 texts) for MoEML; The Merchant of Venice with Stephen Wittek for the NISE; and Heywood’s 2 If You Know Not Me You Know Nobody for DRE. Her articles have appeared in Digital Humanities Quarterly, Shakespeare Bulletin, Renaissance and Reformation, Scholarly Editing, and Digital Studies/Champs Numeriques. Chapters appear in Teaching Early Modern Literature from the Archives (MLA); New Directions in the Geohumanities (Routledge); Early Modern Studies and the Digital Turn (Iter); Placing Names: Enriching and Integrating Gazetteers (Indiana); Early Modern Studies and the Digital Turn (Iter); Making Things and Drawing Boundaries (Minnesota); Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study (Routledge); and Civic Performance: Pageantry and Entertainments in Early Modern London (Routledge).

 

vendredi 10 mars 2023, 17h30-19h, Harry Newman, “Character, Reproduction, and Authorship in Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale”

Séance organisée par : Université Versailles St Quentin (Paris Saclay)

Lieu : Sorbonne Université, rue de la Sorbonne (75005), salle F671 (free – if you are planning to attend please send a message to our secretary, Mathilde Alazraki, by 8 March: mathilde.alazraki@hotmail.fr)

+ Zoom (free – to receive the link, please fill in the registration form by 8 March: https://forms.gle/kAwQTV7cDgbtbFFr9

There is still a widespread belief that towards the end of his career Shakespeare turned away from radical experiments with character (especially what is often called “inwardness”), adjusting his methods to privilege instead plot, action, and—as Anne Barton put it forty years ago—“the impersonal quality of a moment of dramatic time.” In this talk, I want to offer a reading of The Winter’s Tale (c. 1610) that puts a new spin on the debate about the place of character in “late” Shakespeare, exploring the play’s role in the treatment of Shakespeare the author as a character in literary history. Focusing on notions of reproduction and retrospection, I suggest that the tragi-comedy is central to the historical and enduring characterisation of Shakespeare as an immortal father of literature whose “dead likeness”—in Paulina’s phrase, describing Hermione’s statue—can be found in his plays. Most significantly, The Winter’s Tale shaped the bookish staging of Shakespeare as a deceased author (“the late” Shakespeare) in the influential opening leaves of the volume whose 400th anniversary we are celebrating this year, the First Folio of 1623.

Harry Newman is a senior lecturer in Shakespeare and Early Modern Literature at Royal Holloway, University of London. He works on theatre and book history, gender and sexuality, and the history of medicine and technology. His first monograph, Impressive Shakespeare: Identity, Authority and the Imprint in Shakespearean Drama, was published by Routledge in 2019, and he has edited special journal issues on “Metatheatre and Early Modern Drama” for Shakespeare Bulletin (vol. 36, no. 1, 2018; co-edited with Sarah Dustagheer) and on “Character Beyond Shakespeare” for the Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies (vol. 21, no. 2, 2021). He is currently working on an alternative history of character in early modernity, and writing the introduction to the next Oxford World Classics edition of The Winter’s Tale.

Vendredi 10 février 2023, 17h30-19h: Alexander Samson (UCL), Hispanic Worlds in English Renaissance Culture 

Séance organisée par : Université Paris Nanterre

Lieu : Sorbonne Université, rue de la Sorbonne (75005), salle F671 (free – if you are planning to attend please send a message to our secretary, Mathilde Alazraki, by 8 February: mathilde.alazraki@hotmail.fr)

+ Zoom (free – to receive the link, please fill in the registration form by 8 February: https://forms.gle/CKrifuHPk3S5NXvG8)

My work on Anglo-Spanish cultural and political relations began with doctoral research and eventually a monograph on the marriage of Mary I and Philip II, followed by a fellowship studying cultural and intellectual exchanges.  That it comes as a surprise to many people that England had a Spanish king in the mid-Tudor period and was ruled by the same monarch who thirty years later would attempt an invasion of the country with his Gran Armada is a telling reflection of how marginal and peripheral Spain and its culture have been in accounts of both the literary history and historiography of early modern England. Habsburg Spain’s hegemony in Europe in this period was not without fruit in the realms of art, literature, and culture. Multidirectional, many-layered, multi-dimensional contacts, encounters, and exchanges, through translation, peace and war, sharing and appropriating technology and material practices, produced a complex web of dynamic, shaping and determining influences. Transnational, connected, and global history approaches have complicated and undermined literary histories rooted in communities that had yet to come into being and languages whose identification with culture was merely emergent. In this presentation, I propose to present some early results from my work producing a new synthesis about England and Spain in the early modern period, which recognises that while often disavowed Hispanic worlds were nevertheless key to the emergence of many aspects of English Renaissance Culture.

Alexander Samson is Professor of Early Modern Studies in the Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies. His research interests encompass the early colonial history of the Americas, Anglo-Spanish intercultural interactions and early modern English and Spanish drama. He has edited volumes on The Spanish Match: Prince Charles’s Journey to Madrid, 1623 (Ashgate, 2006),  A Companion to Lope de Vega (Woodbridge: Tamesis, 2008) with Jonathan Thacker, Locus Amoenus: Gardens and Horticulture in the Renaissance, a monographic Special Issue of Renaisance Studies (2012), and Philip IV and the World of Spain’s Rey Planeta (Boydell and Brewer, forthcoming) with Stephen Hart. He has published articles and book chapters on everything from historiography and royal chroniclers in 16th century Spain to English travel writers, firearms, maps, John Fletcher, Cervantes, female Golden Age dramatists and historical fiction. His book Mary and Philip: the Marriage of Tudor England and Habsburg Spain was published by Manchester University Press in 2020. He is currently working on a book provisionally entitled Hispanic Worlds in English Renaissance Culture, as well as editions of Lope de Vega’s Lo fingido verdadero and James Mabbe’s Exemplary Novels. He runs the Golden Age and Renaissance Research Seminar and directs UCL’s Centre for Early Modern Exchanges and the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters.

20 January, Heidi Brayman, Soundproof

Heidi Brayman (UCR), Soundproof: Deafness, Muteness, and Alterabilities in Early Modern England

Maison de la recherche Sorbonne nouvelle, 4 rue des Irlandais (75005), salle du conseil (5.30pm-7pm)

Also via Zoom (ask our secretary for link)

A religious, legal, and literary history of deafness and muteness, Soundproof considers a range of vocal silences and alternative modes of communication in early modern England, exploring the status and meaning of deafness and muteness as disability, practice, ploy, and convention in households, theaters, abbeys, and courts of law. The project engages the deeply complicated forms of representing disability in the early modern period – the moment, for example, when the assumption that the congenitally deaf are inevitably mute was at last called into question. As the pun in the title suggests, the book is also concerned with issues of evidence and proof, and it seeks to make a methodological and theoretical intervention into our understanding of historical and literary standards of evidence and argument.

Heidi Brayman is Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Riverside. Her first monograph, Reading Material, is a study of print, gender and literacy in early modern England; she has also co-edited three volumes, Reading Women: Literacy, Authorship, and Culture in the Atlantic World, 1500-1800; Teaching Early Modern English Literature from the Archives; and Books in History, Books as History: New Intersections of the Material Text. A former Trustee of the Shakespeare Association of America, she turns in her current book project to a more explicit engagement with English theatrical practice and performance, along with religious history, devotional lyric, and critical disability studies.

2 décembre 2022, bookclub

Friday, 2 December, 5.30-7pm (Paris time), Sorbonne université (rue de la Sorbonne, 75005, salle F671) + Zoom (ask our secretary for the link)

Books published by PEMS members in 2022 will be presented:

Laetitia Sansonetti and Rémi Vuillemin (eds), Language Commonality and Literary Communities in Early Modern England. Translation, Transmission, Transfer (Turnhout, Brepols, 2022)

https://www.brepols.net/products/IS-9782503598147-1

The volume focuses on the role of translation and lexical borrowing in the expansion of specific English lexicons (erudite, technical, or artisanal) as evidenced in printed texts from the early modern period. It considers how language shapes identity in social, religious, philosophical, artistic and literary contexts, and is in turn shaped by claims of social, religious, philosophical, artistic and literary identity.

  • Presented by Laetitia Sansonetti (Université Paris Nanterre & IUF)

Greg Miller & Anne-Marie Miller-Blaise, Edward and George Herbert in the European Republic of Letters, Manchester University Press, 2022

https://manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9781526164094/ 

This collection explores connections between the full range of the Herbert brothers’ writings and activities, despite the apparent differences both in what they wrote and in how they lived their lives. More specifically, the volume demonstrates that despite these differences, each conceived of their extended republic of letters as militating against a violent and exclusive catholicity; theirs was a communion in which contention (or disputation) served to develop more dynamic forms of comprehensiveness. The literary, philosophical and musical production of the Herbert brothers appears here in its full European context, connected as they were with the Sidney clan and its investment in international Protestantism.

  • Presented by Greg Miller (poet-scholar, Professor Emeritus from Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi) and Anne-Marie Miller-Blaise (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle)

13 octobre 2022: Pierre Kapitaniak, Apparitions, Plagiarism, and the Holy League: A Critical Edition of Noël Taillepied’s Psichologie (1588)

Séance organisée par l’université Paris Cité (LARCA)

17h30-19h (Paris time)

Lieu: Maison de la recherche Sorbonne Université, 28 rue Serpente (75006), amphi Molinié, D035 / also via Zoom: please write to our secretary, Mathilde Alazraki, for the link (mathilde.alazraki@hotmail.fr) 

In 1587 Noël Taillepied, a Franciscan friar, undertakes to write a treatise about apparitions, which he chooses to entitle Psichologie in order to rehabilitate the belief in purgatory, and consequently in the return of the souls of the deceased against the growing reformed heresy that reduces all apparitions to angels or devils and claims that miracles have ceased. But the book seems to have been published in a hurry and its publication coincides with the peak in the activity of the Holy League in Paris. Beyond mere curiosity of discovering yet another early modern treatise on the supernatural, editing Psichologie aims at unravelling Taillepied’s plagiarising techniques, his close interactions with the Parisian printers, and his possible implication in the League militancy.

Pierre Kapitaniak is professor of Early Modern British Civilisation at Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3. He works on Elizabethan drama as well as on the conception, perception and representation of supernatural phenomena from the 16th to the 18th century. He published Spectres, Ombres et fantômes : Discours et représentations dramatiques en Angleterre (Honoré Champion, 2008), and co-edited Fictions du diable : démonologie et littérature (Droz, 2007). He translated into French and edited Thomas Middleton’s play The Witch/ La sorcière (Classiques Garnier, 2012). He is also engaged with Jean Migrenne in a long-term project of translating early modern demonological treatises, and has already published James VI’s Démonologie (Jérôme Millon, 2010) and Reginald Scot’s La sorcellerie démystifiée (Millon, 2015). He is currently preparing the edition of Noël Taillepied’s Psichologie (1588).